Thursday, January 9, 2014

Review and Giveaway: Eggs in a Casket

Eggs in a Casket (Cackleberry Club Mystery - Book 5)

Publication Date: 01/07/2014
Publisher: Penguin Group
Imprint: Berkley Prime Crime
Genre: Cozy Mystery
Pages: 336
ISBN-10: 0425255581
ISBN-13: 978-042525582

(Received for an honest review from the author)

Purchase: Amazon, Barnes & Noble, Book Depository, Indiebound

Laura Childs on the WEB: Website, facebook, goodreads

Books in the series

Eggs in Purgatory (2008), Eggs Benedict Arnold (2009), Bedeviled Eggs (2010), Stake & Eggs (2012), Eggs in a Casket (2014)

Coverart: Click the Image for a larger, clearer view of the covers in this series.




Synopsis:

The ladies of the Cackleberry Club are always ready to serve—whether they’re cooking up breakfast or sniffing out a bad egg.
 
While Petra handles the breakfast rush at the Cackleberry Club, the cafĂ©’s other two owners, Suzanne and Toni, head to Memorial Cemetery to help prepare for its 150th anniversary celebration. But as they search the winding paths for the historical society tent, they discover something else out of place: the body of ex-prison warden Lester Drummond lying facedown in someone else’s freshly dug grave.
 
In the small town of Kindred, everyone knows everyone, and Lester was no exception. Suzanne knew him as the creepy guy who made unwanted advances on her friend Missy Langston. But now it appears the man was hiding a few secrets…and at least one of them was worth killing for.
 
As the case cracks open, there are plenty of suspects to consider—from recent parolees to Missy herself, who Suzanne and Toni saw speeding away just before they found the body. Now, with a cemetery celebration in the offing, and the local authorities in over their heads, it’s up to the Cackleberry Club to unscramble the clues and clear their friend’s name.


Thoughts:

Laura Childs brings readers the fifth book in her Cackleberry Club mystery series, Eggs in a Casket. When three friends, who are at loose ends, decide to open a cafe that specializes in eggs, nobody realized that an amateur sleuthing team was in the offing. Readers will be drawn to Childs' three amazing protagonists in this series and to the small town setting of Kindred. Childs has a remarkable eye for detail and even the smallest of things becomes important. With bodies turning up in odd places and a Cemetery Celebration in the works, this is one you won't want to miss.

What I liked:

Laura Childs is easily my favorite cozy writer out there. She has a knack for knowing just the right details to add to each of her series' and to each book to get the reader interested and invested in what happens to these characters. Her attention to detail is astounding. I enjoy all of the tidbits of local happenings. In Eggs in a Casket we see a lot of our favorites and some new members of the community we haven't met before. It's always nice to visit with characters that seem like old friends. Childs draws the reader in quickly with a well drawn small town setting that is just automatically appealing. Kindred is my kind of place.

I liked the whole idea of this series from the beginning. A cafe specializing in eggs was a interesting idea, but the part of the Cackleberry Club that is so endearing is that it becomes the local meeting place, where local denizens come to hear the news and eat good food. It's all about community in this series. In Eggs in a Casket we find that the former prison warden Lester Drummond, was not exactly a model citizen himself. When he turns up murdered on the eve of the 150th anniversary of the local cemetery, it seems only fitting that he be found in a borrowed grave.

You don't hear too many towns celebrating a cemetery. I thought that was a nice touch and added some flavor to the story. I enjoyed the fact that though this is a murder mystery, Childs still shows a great sense of irony and a lot of humor. There are some moments in this book that will have you laughing in spite of the fact that murder is afoot. 

Toni, Petra and Suzanne always seem to get mixed up in police business and this time is no different. I liked the fact that the sheriff is kind of out of commission and it's up to the ladies to help him out of a jam with this case. He always seems to be trying to get them to stay out of his business until he can't seem to get it figured out and this time, he really needs help. It's a great relationship between them and it adds some comic relief as well. 

What I didn't like:

As usual with a Laura Childs book, there wasn't anything to report in this section. Every book I read for her is so well written and fun. It's hard to give a low rating when there isn't anything to criticize.

Bottom Line:

If you haven't read any of Laura Childs books you are really missing out. The Cackleberry Club series has a down home feel with great characters and a town you will wish was your own. Eggs in a Casket is one of my favorites in the series so far. Don't miss it!

Eggs in A Casket is available NOW from your favorite bookseller.

I'm giving this one 5 out of 5 apples from my book bag!




About the Author:


Laura Childs is the New York Times bestselling author of the Tea Shop Mysteries, the Scrapbooking Mysteries, and the Cackleberry Club Mysteries. She is a consummate tea drinker, scrapbooker, and dog lover, and travels frequently to China and Japan with Dr. Bob, her professor husband. In her past life she was a Clio Award–winning advertising writer and CEO of her own marketing firm.


Giveaway Details:

The author is sponsoring a giveaway of two copies of her book, Eggs in a Casket

~ You must be an email subscriber to participate.
~ U.S. Addresses only.
~ The deadline to enter this giveaway is Midnight EST, January 23rd.

1. Please leave a comment describing an unusual celebration you have heard about or been to.
2. Please fill out the FORM.

26 comments:

cyn209 said...

oh darn........I have not heard or been part of any unusual celebrations........

thank you for the giveaway!!!

traveler said...

I have not had any unique or unusual celebrations. saubleb(at)gmail(dot)com

Linda Kish said...

I can't say I have ever heard of any unusual celebrations. I hope I can still enter.
lkish77123 at gmail dot com

Linda Rima said...

Oddest festival I ever attend was the Fireant Festival in Marshall, TX. It's always the 2nd Saturday week in October. 2013 was the 31st annual event.

http://boogiewoogiemarshall.com/fireant/

Tennisce50(at)yahoo(dot)com

Barbara T. said...

Burning Man is not one that I have attended, but it sure looks unusual.

Angela Holland said...

I guess you can say an unusual celebration I have heard about is PirateCon - kind of like comic - con except for pirates. It sounds like fun but I was not able to go this year.

Susie R said...

I haven't been to any unusual Festivals or celebrations but now you have challanged me. I'll have to be on the lookout this year to see if I can find some. The more I think about it the regional Festivals here might seem unusual to someone from another part of the country.

lkleback said...

I love Ground Hog Day in Punxsutawney, PA. It's fun!

mkdmom said...

I love this series too...the Cackleberry Cafe would be mine and my husband's ideal place to own..he'd be the chef & I'd run the book store and yarn shop..ahh dreams!
My town's historical society has an apple festival every year that is held on the grounds of the small local cemetery...fun time, spooky place.

Rita said...

I went to a Scandanavian Festival one time and had a lovely time.

Karen B said...

The St Paul Winter Carnival has been around since 1886 after a NY reporter said the city was "another Siberia, unfit for human habitation" in winter. Well, the carnival isn't until the end of Jan but this past week has felt like Siberia!
kpbarnett1941[at]aol.com

Nancy said...

I can not think of any unusual events that I have heard of or attended.

nlb1050@yahoo.com

Michelle Willms said...

Sadly, I haven't heard of any or been to any unusual celebrations, though the other commenter was correct. There is Burning Man, though I guess I'm rather immune since it's close to me here in Nevada (I lived in the county it was held in for years and years). I did go to it, but I don't really count that. I only went as a member of the press. It was most definitely unusual, though.

Anonymous said...

Have not heard or been involved in a unusual event.

Carol M said...

I haven't heard of any unusual celebration and, of course, I haven't been to any.

Carol N Wong said...

The most unusual one that I have heard is the Gilroy Garlic Festival in California. We were planning to go but missed it each year. I bet it spelled like good food!

CarolNWong(at)aol(dot)com

Nancy Luebke said...

About the most unusual one was a wedding in a city park when it started to rain heavily or our choir singing for a hotel reopening thing. Both didn't seem normal.

Rachelle21 said...

I would say a Wiccan Wedding was one of the most unusual celebrations. It was a very hot day. There was a female "Best Man" wearing a Tux, who fainted thanks to the heat.

The couple is no longer married.

Sue Farrell said...

Locally we have an fish house parade in a town a few miles away--and an all day celebration to go along with it. I think it's really strange.

Renee G said...

My son participated in an Indian ceremony last year at college. All that I remember about it was that they threw paint at each other. I'm not really sure of the meaning.

Elizabeth Schroedle said...

I would have to say the celebration for the "Day of the Dead". An altar of sorts is built in memory of your deceased ones with candles and pictures of them.

Natasha said...

I can't think of anything too strange. We have apple days and peanut butter and jelly festivals, that's the strangest.
Thanks for the chance to win!

lag123 said...

I went to an untraditional funeral once that was truly a celebration of the deceased's life.

lag110 at mchsi dot com

Dotty Kelley said...

The Scooperbowl fundraiser held in Boston every June. It raises money for cancer research.
http://www.celebrateboston.com/scooper-bowl.htm

bn100 said...

haven't heard of any

Michelle F. said...

In Port Clinton or Put-In-Bay, Ohio, for New Year's instead of a ball they drop a Walleye (not a real fish, though!). I think I heard of a pancake toss in England. I think they have a pancake in a skillet and have to flip it over while they run (or something like that).

I like this series and her tea shop series.

catbooks72(at)gmail(dot)com